back pain

The IRD was a Pain in the Back

I had hurt my back before I even started working there. My thinking was that a job change would somehow fix the problem.

Unknown to me at the time of job search and transition was the reality that sitting down all day is not a chiropractic recommendation.  Sitting added pressure to my spine. The sedentary nature of the job, the availability of junk food, and my own lack of self-control resulted in weight gain.  Such gains added additional pressure to my already sore back.

The sedentary nature of the job, the availability of junk food, and my own lack of self-control resulted in weight gain.  Such gains added additional pressure to my already sore back.

And so, at the age of 25, I was made redundant, though medical redundancy was what it was officially called.

How Did It Happen?

I had been working at Mitre 10, in Invercargill, since 2003.  In my three-and-a-bit years there, I had worked in a variety of roles.  In 2007, I was helping to put together some displays in the Seasonal area.

It was moving into winter.  Winter means Mitre 10 focuses its seasonal selling on heating.  One such product was a free standing fire place.

Putting together a free standing fire display involved lifting one from a pallet into position.

I did the lift right in terms of technique.  But it was just too heavy.  The resulting damage was a lacerated disc in my lower back.  Sadly though, it was a long time between when I had sustained the injury and when I had that confirmed by way of MRI.

back-injury

Not knowing in those early days what had really happened to my back meant that I didn’t get the most appropriate treatment.  No surprise the pain did not go away despite some fairly intensive physiotherapy.

The Road Less Traveled

forbidden

In This Series

  1. The IRD was a Pain in the Back
  2. Aspiration
  3. Study
  4. Behive Sails

for posterity

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